Wednesday, April 16, 2014

N is for Nicknames, in case everything you ever called your significant other was Just Not Sweet Enough

Have a Significant Other but never knew what to call them in moments of "awwww"? Tired of repeating "babe" and "sweetie" over and over again? Worry no more, you can always borrow any of the lovey-dovey nicknames below, all translated directly from passionate and exotic Hungarian! Spice up your relationship with more than just "honey"!
Here we go (with phonetic pronunciation guides):

Nyuszibogyó (New See Boh Gyoh) - Bunny Berry
Nyuszibogár (New See Boh Gar) - Bunny Beetle
Nyuszifül (New See Fuhl) - Bunny Ears
Nyuszikutya (New See Kooh Tyah) - Bunny Dog
Nyúlmalac (Newl Mah Latz) - Rabbit Piglet
Cicabogár (Tzih Tzah Boh Gahr) - Kitten Beetle
Tücsöknyúl (Tuh Czok Newl) - Cricket Bunny
Mókustojás (Moh Kush Toh Yash) - Squirrel Egg
(I swear I'm not making this up)

Bogárkám (Boh Gahr Kham) - My Little Beetle
Macikám (Mah Tzih Kahm) - My Little Bear
Mókuskám (Moh Kush Kahm) - My Little Squirrel
Tündérkém (Tuhn Dehr Came) - My Little Fairy
Manócskám (Mah Noh Czkahm) (I realize I didn't make it easier) - My Little Kobold
(I can see a trend in possible My Little Pony spinoffs here)

Cuncimókus (Tsun Tsee Moh Kush) - Cunci Squirrel (not sure what the first part means)
Kincsem (Keen Czehm) - My Treasure (also a very famous Hungarian race horse)
Cicafiú (Tzih Tzah Fee Ooh) - Kitten Boy (for manly men, obviously)
Cukorfalat (Tzuh Kohr Fah Laht) - Bite of Sugar
Csillagvirág (I'll not ever attempt this one) - Starflower
Szívem csücske (See Whem... eh, nevermind) - The corner of my heart (csücsök specifically means a pointy corner, like on a pillow)

And something for less significant others:
Pocok (Poe Tzohk) - Gerbil (usually for younger siblings)
Kisdisznó (Keesh Diss Noh) - Little Pig (ditto)

Use all of them at your own risk.

10 comments:

  1. So to make a Hungarian pet name you just pair an unattractive animal with an attractive one? o.o I'll have to try this *calls the SO a rat dolphin*

    .... I think I'm in trouble. Something tells me these sound a lot better in their native language.

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    1. I did put a warning label on this! :D For future reference, rat dolphin is "patkánydelfin" in Hungarian ;)

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    2. Maybe she'll take to it more easily if I deliver it in Hungarian. X3 Thanks!

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  2. Delfinpatkány (dolphinrat:) I'm gonna use it,,,

    Also: Katicabogárkám (my little ladybug), for male...I got it once, it was very upseting.

    Nyeleshús...Csenge please translate this...just too many meanings on too many levels...

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    1. Piece of meat with a handle? I assume that's also for guys :D

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    2. Nyeleshus was the fried chicken drumstick when we were young...yeah, i guess meat with a handle...and You're right, its for guys...

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  3. How fun to use a HUNGARIAN nick name... great idea! #AtoZchallenge ☮Peace ☮ ღ ONE ℒℴνℯ ღ ☼ Light ☼ visiting from http://4covert2overt.blogspot.com/

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  4. Nyelshús... meat popsickle? :)

    Anyway, a beetle is not unattractive in Hungarian. You can actually just call someone "bogárka" or "bogárkám" (little beetle or my little beetle respectively).

    Also, csillagvirág is easy to transcribe: chill-ah-gh-vi-raahg.

    And "gy" is pronounced like "dy" (like the "di" in "Nadia"), not "gy" (Csenge, you mistyped that in "Nyuszibogyó", which always makes me think of rabbit droppings, to be honest. :)

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  5. What is a cricket bunny? o.O
    Oh dear... I can't ever imagine calling someone a beetle... or a squirrel egg... or a kobold.

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  6. Oh guys, I am just LOL , these are just ridiculous in translation. Thanks a lot!
    Anna Tan, these are really cute nicknames in our hungarian way, we grow up with them so it is normal for us... :-)

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