Saturday, June 6, 2015

Meanwhile in Hungary: Explaining the mystery of the Great Blue Signs

MopDog doesn't usually do politics, but this one might need some explanation.
If you have Hungarian friends on social media, you might have seen a series of blue images with white text on them, shared with great fervor and a lot of exclamation marks.
Here is what's going on:
The Hungarian government has recently embarked on a campaign against "economical immigration." In order to fire the masses up against immigrants that "take our jobs and ruin our culture" they paid 300 million Forints (app. a million dollars) for a billboard campaign that sends three distinct messages all over Budapest:

"IF YOU COME TO HUNGARY, YOU CAN'T TAKE HUNGARIANS' JOBS!"

(It also says "Government Information" as well as "National Consultation on Immigration and Terrorism")

"IF YOU COME TO HUNGARY, YOU HAVE TO RESPECT OUR CULTURE!"

"IF YOU COME TO HUNGARY, YOU HAVE TO RESPECT OUR LAWS!"

The fact that all the signs are in Hungarian, but they talk to supposed fresh-off-the-boat immigrants, has been the focus of several critiques. Also, an immediate flood of memes followed, with Photoshopped signs reading "If you come to Hungary, we apologize," "If you come to Hungary, you can't take Hungarians' community service," and "If you come to Hungary, say hi to my mom, I'm already living in London."

The rest of the commenting I'll just leave up to the good people of the Internet.

4 comments:

  1. Politicians, what can you say. Those Greeks or whoever slipping into Hungary need to mind their p's and q's. Sort of like the saber rattling about people from Latin America coming to the US. At the moment, the economy is no great deal for them and they are not coming.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'll never understand this mentality: "They terk er jerbs!!" Migrant workers are a good thing for a country and besides, as the last photoshopped comment suggests, migration works both ways...

    In Japan the government has finally decided that, "yes, we need more foreigners to work here." Their solution? Make it easier for more foreigners to come in, but harder for them to stay longer than a year. Then they all presumably patted themselves on the back for how progressive they were being. 9.9

    ReplyDelete
  3. As I live in Texas, I can understand from whence they are coming. I have no problem with Mexican citizens immigrating legally. But I do have a problem with so many (adults) not trying to learn English. As to culture, one would obviously want to hold on to things from their homeland but they should definitely embrace the new things of the land they move to. Otherwise, why move? For over 100 and fifty years, people came to America to be Americans. Then sometime after that, it became that many were coming just to enjoy our freedoms and benefits, but didn't want to really become an American. They wanted to still be whatever they were previously first and foremost. That's backwards. That's wrong.

    ReplyDelete
  4. What Barbara fails to mention is that Texas used to be part of Mexico. The Mexican government encouraged immigration to help settle what seemed to be empty land (overlooking the Native Americans who had always been there). The immigrants from the U.S. turned out to be very bad guests. They neither respected the Mexicans' Catholicism, nor wanted to learn Spanish. Eventually they revolted against their Hosts, because Mexico didn't allow slavery. Ironically, the 'Texicans' were fighting for the Freedom to own Slaves! As far as Mexicans are concerned, Texas is their country. Lastly, in the entire history of the U.S., there is no record of any immigrant group coming to America that was prepared to join the existing culture the second they stepped off the boat. If the original English, French, and Spanish had been, we'd all be Native Americans! Assimilation is a Second and Third generation phenomenon. Another irony: before the Revolutionary War, Ben Franklin peevishly described Mennonite settlers in Pennsylvania as "Boors from Germany who persist in speaking their German Tongue." (Today, we know them as the Amish.) Later, during the War, when anti-British sentiment was very high, Franklin actually proposed that German be the official language of the Colonies.

    ReplyDelete